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Road Rage 

 

Road rage can be defined as 'violent behaviour exhibited by drivers in traffic, often as a

manifestation of stress.'

 

Road rage is not new but it is a growing problem. It was first recognised in the USA in the 1980s.

In the 1990s it became noticeable in the UK and is, unfortunately, now becoming more common.

 

Many accidents, and incidents of 'road rage', are the direct result of inappropriate and unsociable

attitudes exhibited by some drivers, but what do you do about it if it happens to you?

 

But it won't happen to me - will it?

 

So you are a good driver. You always take care on the road and act courteously towards other drivers, always giving way when appropriate, sticking to the rules, etc.

 

But, sooner or later you will be faced with aggressive drivers who cut in front of you, slow you up, overtake on the wrong side, swear at you whether or not you have made a mistake, or simply behave in an anti-social way.

 

One definition of road rage is 'unchecked behaviour designed to cause harm to another road user' - often, however, the person committing the road rage is acting totally out of character and sometimes out of control.

 

Some drivers describe the red mist which clouds their judgment. They get so angry they only concentrate on getting even with another driver.

 

This egocentric behaviour is similar to that exhibited by angry children who cannot rationalise behaviour in a given situation. Sadly, drivers can all too easily be killed or injured when they are in this state. So here's a question..

 

Have you ever lost your temper? (Not just on the road, but anywhere) 

 

If the answer to the question is 'No', see a doctor. But if you are 'normal' and you get mad from time to time, you will probably get mad on the road sooner or later; a survey carried out by the UK motoring organisation Green Flag 2007 found that eight out of ten drivers experienced some sort of road rage once a week or more.

 

Do you ever feel that other drivers should pay more attention? Have you ever been frustrated when stuck in traffic? Have you ever suggested to another driver (politely) that perhaps they could have done something differently?

 

If the answer to this is YES then perhaps the way to go is take a deep breath and concentrate on your own driving.  More people will have an accident reacting to others driving than you think. 

 

IF IN DOUBT, THINK SAFETY!